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Killer of Gods!

I reblog a lot of everything.

Check out anne-imator.tumblr.com for doodles.






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Tagged as: smieska,


woohoo, got a new photo for Id at work.. this time im wearing makeup and nice clothes and actually look presentable heh





(Source: teabagandpatches)



(Source: lyndseyunfamous)



(Source: stoned-house-wife)


johnhoustonstockton:

just wanna get rich enough to buy my mom all the shit she deserves and then die

(via iraya)




parttimehomosexual:

i have like 609453804 books to read

but you know what i’m gonna do

i’m gonna buy more books

And then I will read fanfiction.

and then i will read books that i’ve already read

(Source: batmanbentley, via iraya)





fashionsfromhistory:

Costume for Margot Fonteyn as Odelie in “Swan Lake”
Nicholas Georgiadis
1964

Nicholas Georgiadis designed this superb black and silver tutu worn by Margot Fonteyn as Odile in Act III of Swan Lake in Vienna in 1964. She and Rudolf Nureyev were a huge success in the ballet, receiving 49 curtain calls on the first night. Although a highly conventional style, the tutu does, in fact, subtly change over the years. In the 1950s, most tutu skirts were flat and rigid, and are often referred to as ‘plate’ tutus. This tutu is an example of the style of the 1960s and early 1970s, when the skirts softened into a gentle droop. The softer line suited Fonteyn at that late stage of her career, as did the bodice decoration, which subtly breaks up the surface without becoming fussy, with the main decoration concentrated at centre front. The skill in designing tutu bodices, which Georgiadis understood well, is to use decoration that will be practical for partnering; too many jewels or encrustations can cut a partner’s hands. Odile, the swan princess, has been dressed in white since Swan Lake was created in 1890, but the convention of dressing the evil Odile in black is a later development - Alicia Markova wore red when she danced Odile for the Vic-Wells (now Royal) Ballet in 1934. Black is now so widely accepted, that for over fifty years the Act III pas de deux has been called the Black Swan pas de deux.

V&A

fashionsfromhistory:

Costume for Margot Fonteyn as Odelie in “Swan Lake”

Nicholas Georgiadis

1964

Nicholas Georgiadis designed this superb black and silver tutu worn by Margot Fonteyn as Odile in Act III of Swan Lake in Vienna in 1964. She and Rudolf Nureyev were a huge success in the ballet, receiving 49 curtain calls on the first night. Although a highly conventional style, the tutu does, in fact, subtly change over the years. In the 1950s, most tutu skirts were flat and rigid, and are often referred to as ‘plate’ tutus. This tutu is an example of the style of the 1960s and early 1970s, when the skirts softened into a gentle droop. The softer line suited Fonteyn at that late stage of her career, as did the bodice decoration, which subtly breaks up the surface without becoming fussy, with the main decoration concentrated at centre front. The skill in designing tutu bodices, which Georgiadis understood well, is to use decoration that will be practical for partnering; too many jewels or encrustations can cut a partner’s hands. Odile, the swan princess, has been dressed in white since Swan Lake was created in 1890, but the convention of dressing the evil Odile in black is a later development - Alicia Markova wore red when she danced Odile for the Vic-Wells (now Royal) Ballet in 1934. Black is now so widely accepted, that for over fifty years the Act III pas de deux has been called the Black Swan pas de deux.

V&A

(via fashionsfromhistory)


littleaphheadcanons:

Lately the micronations have been daring each other to go up to one of the stingy nations and yell “Hey Macklemore, can we go thrift shopping?” Austria and Switzerland gave them death glares. Scotland grabbed a tablecloth, wrapped it round himself toga-style and bellowed, “Ask yer grandpa, can I have his hand-me-doons?” Then he scooped them all up and took them thrift shopping.

(via owynsama)





rossdraws:

Something I started last year. Really wanted to finish this one!

rossdraws:

Something I started last year. Really wanted to finish this one!

(via moosesmeeses)




dimisfit:

Reblog friendly link!

I didn’t mean to write an essay, yet still I would’ve gone more in detail. To make my point clear how the film is not a failure but had high expectations, think of the film like a gator, you can’t expect a gator to climb a tree but the gator is still worth something in itself.

A very long, but completely accurate post on the nature of box office sales and the really, really great importance of release dates. I personally adored The Princess and The Frog, especially Tiana! Seriously a voice for young women with aspirations greater than their circumstances!



lolitaintheskywithdiamonds:

lamp from the interior’s section of Victoria Maiden

(via iraya)

5,741 notes
Tagged as: want,

smieska:

big buff baby-faced matthew is my favourite boi

smieska:

big buff baby-faced matthew is my favourite boi

(via alfredolliesouttie)




oelm:

Garnet’s the strongest gem.  Don’t forget it.

(via iraya)



gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.

Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.

1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.

2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.

3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”

You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.

(Source: elementarymydearworld, via darksstars)